2018 BSV September Saturday Program

With longer days and warmer weather, our trees are slowly entering the spring growth phase and generating much work for bonsai enthusiasts.  Unfortunately, the weeds are also strongly responding to these changes generating even more work.

BSV Members met at our normal venue to work on their trees and seek advice and guidance from other members; and to have a chat and catch up.  Repotting, re-styling and trimming activities were the main focus.  A very productive afternoon was had by all.

Photos of many of these activities are included below.

Norway Spruce
Norway Spruce
Elm branch development.
Elm branch development.
Red Pine trim
Red Pine trim

 

This old Liquidamber received treatment on the top and the bottom.

Liquidamber styling
Liquidamber styling
Liquidamber - removing a root issue.
Liquidamber – removing a root issue.

 

See the before and after photos of this Juniper which are designed to improve the trunk taper.

Juniper - before
Juniper – before
Juniper - after
Juniper – after
Fig - After repotting and styling adjustment
Fig – After repotting and styling adjustment
Group Planting tidy up.
Group Planting tidy up.

2018 BSV Monday – Styling Native Trees – Roger Hnatiuk

The BSV had great pleasure in welcoming Roger Hnatiuk to our Monday meeting to talk about the design and styling of bonsai in the context of Australian tree species and landscapes.  It was a very interesting and informative discussion and several of Roger’s views on these subjects are included below.

  • In designing Australian species as bonsai, Roger suggested we should design to tell stories that connect with the landscape, its colour and its people.
  • The essentials for Design include
    • Wire, soils, tools, etc.
    • Artistic concepts, balance, colour, texture, movement, etc.
    • Knowledge and experience of trees, how they grow, etc., and
    • Your spirit, soul, artistic voice, style.
  • Roger noted that many bonsai enthusiasts were often more impressed with the design rather than the art and the aesthetics.
  • Pictures of several trees were used to illustrate how the tree and the pot could work together to tell a great story that was more than just the tree’s form.
  • Roger challenged the desire to have one front only suggesting that other views can be important as well.  Be mindful of how your tree will be displayed and viewed when styling your tree.
  • Studying trees in their natural environment can assist in the styling process.
  • Roger reminded all of John Naka’s quote.  “Don’t turn your tree into a bonsai, turn your bonsai into a tree.”.
Roger reviewing a Banksia.
Roger reviewing a Banksia.
Roger reviewing a Baeckea
Roger reviewing a Baeckea

Many thanks to Roger for his insightful views.

Victor thanking Roger.
Victor thanking Roger.

 

Photos of bonsai on display are included below.

Chaenomeles japonica
Chaenomeles japonica
Japanese Maple
Japanese Maple
Banksia integrifolia
Banksia integrifolia
Baeckea brevifolia
Baeckea brevifolia
Baeckea brevifolia
Baeckea brevifolia

2018 August Workshops with Don De Luca

On Saturday the 11th August we had the wonderful Don De Luca conduct two workshop sessions. Everyone had a fantastic time working on their trees under Don’s watchful eye as he helped each participant develop an improved tree.

Don’s vast experience with a variety of tree types and his bonsai styling skills provide an opportunity for members to learn much in this workshop. Everyone not only enjoyed the workshop but appreciated Don’s warmth and friendship.  It was a huge learning curve for a few members as this was the first time they had participated in or experienced a workshop and they want more as they can see the benefits of working with a wonderful tutor and teacher.

Don was delighted with the range and pearls in the material to be worked on. Too soon we ran out of time but look forward to having Don back.

Many of you had the fantastic opportunity of working with Bjorn at the AABC conference and I am sure you all agree that that was a fantastic opportunity to not only working on your tree but with a wonderful and talented person.

Several photos of the workshop activity are included below.

Don fine tuning the styling.
Don fine tuning the styling.
Jade tree having an extensive haircut to encourage finer ramification.
Jade tree having an extensive haircut to encourage finer ramification.
Rubber and wire applied to this Pine prior to bending.
Rubber and wire applied to this Pine prior to bending.
Eucalyptus after a new pot.
Eucalyptus after a new pot.
Don indicating which branches are not required for this style.
Don indicating which branches are not required for this style.
Don contemplating best style options for this Pine.
Don contemplating best style options for this Pine.
Back of fig showing styling work in progress.
Back of fig showing styling work in progress.

2018 July Saturday Program-Triple Trunk Trident Maples

On a fine and heated Saturday, BSV Members gathered in East Kew to develop their skills on deciduous trees. It was a very busy afternoon and significant progress was made in the various activities.  See the gathering below.

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Victor L. led another session on growing triple trunk Trident Maples.  This session followed up plantings done last year, helped Members create new plantings and demonstrated the next stage in the process where the metal plate is removed and the triple trunk repotted.  See photos below.

Preparing for the Trident Maple triple trunk exercise.
Preparing for the Trident Maple triple trunk exercise.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.

Photos below show plate removal steps.

Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development.
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development - removing the plate
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development – removing the plate
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development - removing the plate
Trident Maple Triple Trunk development – removing the plate

Facilities were also available to assist Members in their repotting activity.

Repotting
Repotting
Repotting
Repotting

Mark L., Victor B. and Victor L. provided assistance to Members with developing and styling their trees.  Photos of several examples are included below

Reviewing style.
Reviewing style.
Chinese Elms in development.
Chinese Elms in development.
Trident Maples
Trident Maples
Styling adjustments
Styling adjustments
Applying styling adjustments.
Applying styling adjustments.

 

2018 June Monday – Desert Ash Demonstration

The BSV was very pleased to welcome Don De Luca from Hay in NSW to talk about growing Desert Ash trees as bonsai.  Don spent time talking about the extreme weather conditions that exist in Hay and how these can have a big impact on growing techniques.  Participants were also reminded that even in Melbourne, there are many different micro-climates and bonsai enthusiasts need to be aware of these to ensure their Desert Ash can flourish.  Desert Ash examples displayed by Don are included below.

Desert Ash
Desert Ash
Desert Ash
Desert Ash

 

Desert Ash styling almost done.
Desert Ash styling almost done.

Don’s preferred area of interest is the development of the trunk and branches.  Below is a photo showing how Don trimmed a Desert Ash ready for the next seasons growth.  Significant reductions in development times can be achieved if you are able to access Yamadori trunks.  For example, techniques applied by Don can usually achieve the branching and ramification shown above in the blue pot in about 5 years from stock similar to that in the black pot below.

Desert Ash trimmed for next stage of trunk & branch development.
Desert Ash trimmed for next stage of trunk & branch development.

Don then moved on to demonstrate the fine tuning necessary to finish off the development of a Desert Ash using this process.  The tree is shown below with the master at work.

Tree has been wired and final shaping is applied.
Tree has been wired and final shaping is applied.

See below for bonsai growing wisdom from Don

  • Access to Yamadori stock such as Dave’s in Bendigo can give you a great head start in the bonsai development process.  In Hay, Don uses Styrene pots or big pots to help protect plants from the extreme weather and keep their roots cool.
  • Don finds defoliation to be a great technique for faster development.  Total defoliation works well in Hay but in Melbourne, it may need to be modified.  For example, a variant could be to remove the outer leaves but leave the inner leaves.  You may need to experiment in your own local area to find the best approach for you.
  • Trees with big bases usually mean lots of big cuts to develop attractive taper.  Don says be brutal.  If you can’t hide a wound, make it a feature.
  • Keep the future style and taper in mind when cutting back shoots.
  • Remove any growth at the wrong angle.
  • Wiring can speed the development process and is essential to finish the tree.  Don prefers starting at the bottom and working up the tree.
  • Don has found that letting the wire cut in can assist the development of the rough bark.  See examples below.

Examples of the detailed branch structure and ramification are included below.

Branch development
Branch development
Branch development
Branch development
President Victor thanking Don.
President Victor thanking Don.

Members trees on display are included below.

Continue reading 2018 June Monday – Desert Ash Demonstration

2018 May Novice Training #3

A hugely successful Novice #3 beginners’ session has just been completed. Without doubt, the BSV Novice Program has to be the best value beginners’ program in Melbourne. Huge thanks to Mark Ludlow, owner of Master’s Apprentice Bonsai School and Nursery, for being our most patient and informative teacher. Also huge thanks to Victor Byrdy, BSV President, for having the vision to make such a fabulous learning opportunity available to bonsai novices.

The BSV Novice Program will be available again in three sessions during September, October and November later this year. Current cost for members is $60 per session ($80 per session for non-members). Participants receive detailed notes, two plants per session on which to apply their new found artistic skills and one on one support.

Tools and wire are available during the sessions so there is no need to rush out and buy gear. I thoroughly recommend completing this program if you are a novice. More information will be posted on this site, in due course, regarding the next program. Go forth and bonsai!!!!

Below are photos from the session.

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2018 May Monday – Pines Workshop

On a mild autumn evening, over 40 BSV members gathered to hear Scott talk about growing and maintaining Japanese Black Pines.  Scott briefly outlined the key aspects of growing Black Pines as bonsai and then proceeded to assist members with their own pines.

Scott talking about maintaining Japanese Black Pines
Scott talking about maintaining Japanese Black Pines

Some of the points made by Scott are listed below:

  • Autumn/Winter – bud selection, needle plucking, feeding, wiring and styling.
  • Spring – candle breaking and feeding.
  • Summer – decandling and energy balancing.
  • Many of these activities are focussed on balancing growth.  Scott promotes the “Goldilocks Approach” – not too strong and not too weak.
  • Needle plucking – best to work from top down and ensure plucking in the same direction of the needles to avoid damage to the branch.
  • Avoid spiking yourself by working up and under.
  • Black Pines need full sun and air movement.
  • Feed well in autumn and spring.
  • A significant time investment is required to properly maintained black pine bonsai.

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Some examples of the workshop activity are included below.

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Trees on show are displayed below.

Continue reading 2018 May Monday – Pines Workshop

2018 May Saturday Program

Following the first blast of some real winter temperatures and rain, BSV Members met to work on their trees and get them ready for winter.  Heaters, hot drinks and a warm afternoon tea helped keep the cold at bay.

A selection of trees being worked on by members is included below.

 

Pine - unusual variety.
Pine – unusual variety.

Evidence of a styling plan being applied.

Pine
Pine
Desert Ash.
Desert Ash.
Pine clean up.
Pine clean up.
Kunzea variety.
Kunzea variety.

The strong growth on this  Kunzea is being trimmed.  Thought to be ericoides species but there is some doubt and further research is in hand.

Pine
Pine
Chinese Elm - "Seiju"
Chinese Elm – “Seiju”

Expert advice is that this small elm is now ready for fine tuning and re-potting in a bonsai pot.

2018 April Monday – Yamadori

At the April BSV Monday meeting, John and Dave talked about collecting Yamadori in Australia and the issues you face when collecting.

John & Dave talking about Yamadori
John & Dave talking about Yamadori

John had several recent Yamadori on display to illustrate the types of trees that could be collected.

Jade Yamadori
Jade Yamadori
Olive Yamadori
Olive Yamadori

They covered a very wide range of issues that you will need to address if you are to be successful at collecting Yamadori.  Some of their comments are included below.

  • Make sure your planned activities are legal.  There are Federal, State and Local Government laws that apply in various circumstances and permits may be required.  Urban Yamadori on private property may be an easier option.
  • Risk management plans are necessary to ensure diggers and the public are kept safe.
  • Yamadori can range from small to very large.
  • Digging and caring for Yamadori are time intensive activities so choose carefully before you start to dig.
  • Dave suggests you select your tree based on nebari, movement, taper and bark.  Branches can be grown later.
  • Some species such as Hawthorn can be temperamental so timing and aftercare are critical.
  • Different techniques such as the “Sweating Technique” and open soil mixes are being experimented with to improve success rates.  The roots need to be kept moist until the tree can be potted.  Some species such as Jade need special treatment to avoid wood rot.
  • Equipment needed depends on many things but could include hand saws, secateurs and a sharp shovel.  A chain saw may also be an option.  Pre-dig preparation can assist.

Photos of trees on display at the Meeting are included below.

Eucalyptus Yamadori
Eucalyptus Yamadori
Eucalyptus Yamadori
Eucalyptus Yamadori
Yellow Box
Yellow Box
Mugo Pine
Mugo Pine
Pine
Pine
English Elm Group
English Elm Group
Lillypilly
Lillypilly
Cotonester
Cotonester
Kingsville Box
Kingsville Box
Lillypilly
Lillypilly
Olive
Olive